2015 Century Watch # 36 – Angelo Mathews

angelo-mathews-getty_630Angelo Mathews – 122 v Pakistan at Pallekele

Angelo Mathews makes his first appearance on Century Watch with his third innings 122 against Pakistan in early July. The second of four centuries in the match, it would end up the second lowest of all test tons at the venue, but also the second by a Sri Lankan at that venue (following on frok Karunaratna’s below). At the time it was the 5th highest score there. It’s also the 20th century made by a Sri Lankan at home against Pakistan.

This was Angelo’s fifth test century, slotting in at #3 in his high score list. He has two tons against England, two against Pakistan and one against Australia. His first against Pakistan came in Abu Dhabi in the early days of 2014 (157 not out) which is also his second highest test score. Mathews has made just one other test hundred at home, and that was against Australia in 2011 at the SSC.

However, we all know when Mathews made his highest test score, although the day he did it has been largely erased from official ECB history. Yes, it’s Mathews wonderful 160 on what we know here and on HDWLIA as “Day 4 at Headingley”. Let’s not go into this much more, eh?

So, Dmitri, have you seen a 122? The answer is no, and not even close! Mathews made the 62nd 122 in test cricket, and the first since Gary Ballance made that score less than three bloody months ago. We have another repeat, ladies and gentlemen! Century Watch #11 refers…..

Like he did with 130, Tom Hayward was the first to make 122 in tests. Looking back on the review of Ballance’s ton, I did not do a history slot for that, so let’s right that here.

Hayward was in the England team that beat South Africa in Johannesburg in 1896 when he made 122 in the first innings of the match. England had fallen to 8 for 2, before Hayward righted the ship and with some late order resistance from the brilliantly English named Hugh Bromley-Davenport (84) and Charles Wright (71) the visitors made 482. The game was made more famous for the performances of a Surrey bowler in the host’s first innings. George Lohmann took 9 for 28 in 14.2 overs as South Africa were dismissed for 151. The only South African wicket to fall to someone else was the first, so it wasn’t as if the ten-for was ever on. Christopher Heseltine took five for England in the second innings, and the visitors won the match comfortably.

Wisden Almanack’s report was a belter. Was Lohmann the KP of his day?

http://www.espncricinfo.com/wisdenalmanack/content/story/153732.html

Angelo Mathews’ 100 came up in 221 balls with 9×4 and 1×6.

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2015 Century Watch #35 – Dimuth Karunaratna

KarunaratneDimuth Karunaratna – 130 v Pakistan at Pallekele

I’ve slipped behind a little with the Century Watch so time to get busy. First up on the Extra Bits Century Watch is a man called Frank! That’s Dimuth Karunaratna’s first name. Sadly we’ve had a 130 already this year (Adam Voges – see Century Watch # 28) so we’ll have to dig a little deeper on the archive section and we don’t have to answer the “have you seen a 130, Dmitri question again).

This was Karunaranta’s second test hundred and did not match his career best 152 made in a monumental effort to save a test at Hagley Park in Christchurch last winter (Sri Lanka lost). At the time it was the 5th test century made at Pallekele, and the first by a Sri Lankan (there are three more hundreds from this game to fill in), and moved into 4th place in the highest individual scores (again, beaten in this match) – the best was by Mike Hussey (142). It is the only century made in the first innings of a Pallekele test match. It was the 19th test century made by a Sri Lankan at home to Pakistan – Sangakkara leads the way with five at home, with Aravinda da Silva having four. Mahela never made a home hundred against Pakistan, which is a massive surprise.

We went through the 130 made by Tom Hayward – the first in tests – so lets move forward from 1899 to 1909 for the second 130. This was made on August 11th at the home of English cricket, the original test venue in this country, The Oval, but it was an Australian who made the score; Warren Bardsley. Bardsley was a left handed opening batsman who on this day completed his 130. This was not particularly noteworthy save for the fact it was his second hundred of the match. He’d made 136 in the first innings, and helped his team to 325. England replied with 352 (Jack Sharp top scoring with 105), so Bardsley took his team to safety in the game with his second hundred of the match. I’ll let Wisden sum this up:

Noble did not attempt to force a win, delaying the closure until four o’clock when the Australians score stood 339 for five wickets. Presumably he though the pitch too good to give his bowlers any chance of getting England out before half past six. Still, though void of excitement, the day’s cricket was memorable, Bardsley following up his 136 with 130 and thus performing the unprecedented feat in Test Matches of getting two separate hundreds. Without making a mistake of any kind he withstood the English bowling for three hours and three quarters. Up to the time he reached his hundred his cricket was delightful to look at, but after that, perhaps from fatigue, he became strangely slow, taking eighty minutes to score his last thirty runs.

So 130 wasn’t so dull after all. Bardsley became the first man to make separate test hundreds in a match! I suppose it’s right it went to a graceful left hander as described by Wisden…

Warren Bardsley, who died in Sydney on January 20, aged 71, was one the greatest left-handed batsmen produced by Australia. Only two of his countrymen, Sir Donald Bradman and AL Hassett, surpassed his record of 53 centuries — 29 of them scored in England — in first-class matches. As a stylist, Bardsley compared favourably with any left-hander of his day. His upright stance and eminently straight bat never failed to exercise a special charm upon spectators, and he used his feet to perfection while employing a wide variety of strokes. If less brilliant in cutting behind point than Clem Hill, he was stronger in hitting past cover and to leg and he possessed a specially powerful straight drive.

So it’s time to sign off, except to say Frank’s 100 came up in 188 balls and contained 10×4.

Lord’s Day 2 – The Pictures – Part 3

More from my day at the Lord’s test. Again, all originals, no Snapseed alterations.

Clarke defends
Clarke defends
Clarke appears to be beaten by this one
Clarke appears to be beaten by this one
Clarke appears to be trying to whip through leg
Clarke appears to be trying to whip through leg
Another defensive shot by Clarke in his curious innings
Another defensive shot by Clarke in his curious innings
Seemed to take a lot of Clarke when facing at the Pavilion End
Seemed to take a lot of Clarke when facing at the Pavilion End
And again.....
And again…..
Snapseeded this one - love this picture of Mark Wood coming into bowl
Snapseeded this one – love this picture of Mark Wood coming into bowl
Immediately before delivery
Immediately before delivery
Smith beaten
Smith beaten
Smith gathers to give one a hit
Smith gathers…..but let’s one go by

Book Talk

Mystery Spinner

I thought I’d try to get a thread going on cricket books. While writing a blog and responding to all sorts of stuff as a result,  the time to read is diminished greatly. That doesn’t get away from some of the great books I’ve read in the past.

My favourite is Mystery Spinner by Gideon Haigh. It was a beautiful read by a master writer, but enhanced by the subject matter. I read it ages ago but its brilliance still resonates. I think I read it so long ago that it pre dates my blogging! It’s conclusion was just beautifully written. That much I remember.

Stick up some of your favourites, and some that were utter dross. I’d nominate any book by Roland Perry, especially the one on Warne, and Flintoff’s first book which was a shocker.

If anyone wants to write a review we can certainly host it on “The Extra Bits”.

Lord’s Day 2 – Pictures Part 2

Some more snaps from the early parts of play at Lord’s on Friday. These are originals, not Snapseeded….

Steve Smith poised....
Steve Smith poised….
Steve Smith Poised Again...
Steve Smith Poised Again…
P1060512
Chris Rogers on the drive
P1060513
Chris Rogers plays into the offside. Sadly I can’t snap every ball and I missed his dismissal….
P1060514
England celebrate the departure of Rogers for 173
Not in perfect focus, but Rogers walks off
Not in perfect focus, but Rogers walks off
P1060516
Even more blurry, but you get the drift!
Michael Clarke comes out to bat
Michael Clarke comes out to bat
Passes the two helmets on the way past.
Passes the two helmets on the way past.
Then leaves a ball in stylish fashion
Then leaves a ball in stylish fashion

Lord’s Day 2 – Original Pics Part 1

Here are some pictures that I’ve not adjusted using the software. Probably put them up in batches…

Ian Ward stands and blocks out the pearly whites of ole Drug Cheat
Ian Ward stands and blocks out the pearly whites of ole Drug Cheat
P1060498
Lord’s – The Morning of Day 2
England walk out, like lambs to the slaughter
England walk out, like lambs to the slaughter
A team united?
A team united?
Smith and Rogers walk out - 337 for 1 wasn't it?
Smith and Rogers walk out – 337 for 1 wasn’t it?
Rogers avoids a short one shortly after being hit
Rogers avoids a short one shortly after being hit
Smith leaves one - I got a lot of pictures of people leaving the ball - nature of test cricket
Smith leaves one – I got a lot of pictures of people leaving the ball – nature of test cricket
Another Smith leave
Another Smith leave – this time with ball by pad
Smith on the defensive
Smith on the defensive
Playing himself in.....
Playing himself in…..

Lords Test – Snapseed Interpretations Part 1

Here is my first set of pictures from Lord’s, using the mobile app called Snapseed to mess around with them (another thing to thank KeyserChris for). Some will work, some might not be as clever. But I hope you enjoy them….

P1060502-01
Chris Rogers gets hit by Jimmy Anderson in the first over of Day 2. The original will be posted later. Let’s hope he’s OK as he’s been taken off this 4th morning with a dizzy spell.
Michael Clarke didn't stay long. Here's an immaculate forward defensive.
Michael Clarke didn’t stay long. Here’s an immaculate forward defensive.
Mark Wood comes into bowl from the Pavilion End.
Mark Wood comes into bowl from the Pavilion End.
Here's Ben Stokes preparing to deliver
Here’s Ben Stokes preparing to deliver
Steve Smith gets into some really odd positions. In many ways he is a snapper's dream...
Steve Smith gets into some really odd positions. In many ways he is a snapper’s dream…
I thought Adam Voges looked really good and played wonderfully before lunch.
I thought Adam Voges looked really good and played wonderfully before lunch.
I think these were Mitchell Marsh's first test runs. A squirty square drive...
I think these were Mitchell Marsh’s first test runs. A squirty square drive…
Steve Smith pulls the ball
Steve Smith pulls the ball
Peter Nevill impressed everyone in his debut innings.
Peter Nevill impressed everyone in his debut innings.
This picture precedes the celebration snaps so I think it is of the shot that gets Steve Smith to 200
This picture precedes the celebration snaps so I think it is of the shot that gets Steve Smith to 200
Smith celebrates his double hundred. Joe Root sportingly applauds
Smith celebrates his double hundred. Joe Root sportingly applauds
Smith looks to the heavens. A tremendous innings.
Smith looks to the heavens. A tremendous innings.
As I said....awkward positions
As I said….awkward positions

Hope you like them. I took around 250 snaps all told (including a lot of leaves) that day and probably for timing I didn’t top the first one above.

A fair few more to come. Keep it tuned to BOC Extra Bits….

What’s All This About?

Being Outside Cricket has been somewhat cluttered recently as The Leg Glance and I try to keep the Ashes stuff going and some of the pieces need to stay up top a little longer. So, to create a bit more space, a new site is being set up to take on board all the stuff that we can’t fit in on the main site.

At this stage I see this being for things like:

  • Century Watch – I’ve wanted to set up a separate page, but wordpress doesn’t really cater for that.
  • Photographs – I take quite a few, and I’d like to put some up here. The template for this site is much better for photographs.
  • Possibly some fisking of journalist articles when the blog doesn’t have enough room for it.

We’ll link the posts on the blog, so you can click over here.

Hope this works.